Lapping at Heels

2014-M645-004-008

This cyclist had been taking phone-photos with a friend and I suppose she wanted to make sure they were okay before leaving. I wouldn’t stand in here with my back to the waves. Look how wet the whole surface is.

The pictures below are the ones I took first from a bit further away and thought I was done – then this shot was presented to me. Even with the sound of waves and the white noise of rolling beach pebbles she still looked up when the Mamiya shutter and power winder went off. Taking a picture sounds like a passing train compared to most other cameras I have used.

2014-M645-004-006a .

2014-M645-004-007

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Mamiya M645 Super, 80mm/f2.8 lens, ISO400, Ilford Delta 400 Pro.

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12 thoughts on “Lapping at Heels

    • Hi Erin – sometimes, but only if I am quite close to them, or if they ask. Mostly, they can’t be sure I was taking their picture and if nothing is said, then the dialogue is not opened! When shooting with a small point and shoot like the Olympus XAs that I always carry in my pocket, then they usually don’t notice.
      However, if it is expressly a picture of someone where they might be recognisable then I usually will ask, and an explanation seems a necessary part of asking. I tried taking street candids for a while, but I never felt comfortable doing it (not to mention wasting a lot of film), so I have decided I will try asking instead. Spontaneity is lost, so it is necessarily a different kind of photography, but one where good pictures can still be made, once I learn how.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Val. Modern meditation often seems to come in the form of contemplating a small screen. It is such a beautiful spot and yet it is necessary to turn her back on it and look at the small picture that was just taken rather than the real thing. Humans are very strange things.

      Like

    • Thanks Alexandra! That pier has the very mundane task of encasing a drain that takes storm water from the roofs and roads and out to the sea – it is quite a drop into the ocean at low tide. I doubt the engineers envisioned its other attractions – people walk on it all the time, and photograph it often too (click my storm drain tag to see what I mean).

      Like

      • And thank you for looking at them. It is getting to be quite a long series. A very compelling place for me. I keep on finding it in a different mood; pretty much every time I go past there is a different scene.

        Like

    • Hi Mike, I was only going to post the main photo, but then the urge overtook to show the others which really were not useable in any other context. I was so pleased to get the top one after the other two, it was one of those photos that I knew right away was going to be a keeper.

      Liked by 1 person

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