Ocean Post Sunrise

As with last Friday, and New Year’s day, I have a long exposure of the ocean from the east side of Harling Point, all taken during the same sunrise. This view is looking to the north past pebble beach and into a corner of McNeill Bay.

As before, there was a bit of swell from the previous evening’s storm which in this long exposure has turned ocean into a layer of fog. The rocks and distant windows are reflecting the warm light from the sun rising beyond Trial Island. The fence post is one that I have featured in an earlier post as well – this is turning into one of my favourite blogging locations. Since I have not placed it on a map before, maybe I should – here is one on which you can even see the straight shadow of the fence line across the rocks.

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Image taken at ISO 100, F6.3, 30 seconds, polarizing filter. Canon EOS 5D MkII, Canon 50mm f1.4 lens.

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23 thoughts on “Ocean Post Sunrise

  1. Pingback: Trial Island Sunrise « burnt embers

    • Welcome to my blog kerry, nice to have you here. I have been admiring your photos of late, some great shots.

      The info on this picture is at the bottom of the post as well. I have taken to putting the info somewhere in a post as this particular theme does not do it automatically and it seems important to some people.

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    • Hey Obrien – welcome back from the maternity ward! I am glad that you like this, it sure is fun to experiment with the camera as I can tell you know from looking at your blog 🙂

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    • Hey Toad – thanks so much. Its a fantastic spot down there. I have a couple more pictures from this shoot that I will post, probably this week. It is a very interesting shoreline.

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  2. I love the foggy water on this shot. I know from previous posts that this was the effect you were trying to achieve and it seems that you have mastered the technique.

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    • Hi Ken. I can’t claim to have mastered the technique. This is at 30 seconds like quite a few of my other shots, but it was one of the first when the light was much lower, so the aperature is much more open. I don’t know if aperature has a role to play in this technique. I am going to have to play with it quite a bit more before I claim any mastery. But, if nothing else, I did stumble upon the effect I wanted.

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