Ross Bay Buoy

A storm drain structure in Ross Bay, Victoria. The Olympic Mountains are in the distance with another view of the slash of white cloud that was so prominent in yesterday’s kayak photo. The kayak photo was taken less than two minutes after this one. I had a planned a shot that had both the kayak and the drain in it, but the owner of the kayak returned with paddles and gear so I was foiled.

I set this picture up to use the fisherman’s buoy as a focal point for the converging lines of the concrete, and this works in the colour version. But in the monochrome it gets lost. If I had the right post-processing software, I would add a touch of pink to the buoy in the monochrome version and then I think that image would work that much better. Still, I like them both, and am not complaining.

.

What I particularly like about these images is the dark shadow edging the concrete on both sides – I am not sure how that came about as intuitively it makes little sense. But it adds a lot to the picture for me. Also, but after some looking, I like the asymmetry at the bottom of the picture with a shallower gravel beach showing on the right and deeper water on the left. And I like the pebbles tossed on top during the storms of a week or two ago.

You can find the other storm drain pictures through this link.

.

Can anyone hear the air hissing around the screw embedded in my tire it in the parking area right behind here?

.

Canon EOS 5Dmkii, Canon 50/1.4 lense, ISO100, f11, 1/125th

.

.

32 thoughts on “Ross Bay Buoy

    • Hi Juanita – me too 🙂 I was down there again today, different tide, different sky, different light. Pictures I took are thus, very different. Will post something later this week I think.

      Like

  1. Pingback: Ross Bay Zigzag « burnt embers

    • Can’t answer your question. But yeah, for such a tiny spot of colour in a pretty muted photo, it sure does draw the eye. As it did when I was out there. I still think something more can be done with this image, just trying to figure out what, and get some more skills to go with it. I will probably return to it in the future.

      Like

    • Thank you Ryan. I am so pleased that people are responding to this image this way. It is very gratifying to be able to make a photo of an object that is so average into something interesting.

      Like

  2. I heard the hissing. Thought it was a mossie. Hope it didn’t take you too long to get the tire fixed and off on the road again.

    Thanks so much for the tips on how to change my subscription email format. It has worked really well and i am getting loads more clicks.

    Once again I am totally entranced by your photos. In some ways I’d love to see your pictures in a book so that I could flick through them any time, anywhere, yet I think the blog format is particularly perfect for your work. The theme you’ve chosen is wonderful and the luminosity of the screen adds so much that could be lost in a printing process. I think I’ve said before that I feel able to dive into your images to explore them, never more so than in today’s post. It is visual poetry for me and it I was more of a poet myself, I’m sure I could identify better in words, how moving I find these two images – particularly the B&W one.

    After writing the above, I read the other comments. Isn’t it great how many people feel so moved by your work?

    Like

    • Hi Katherine – well, that hissing started up again and yesterday I had to change the tire in a dreary industrial section of town. I was visiting a new craft brewery to buy some product, which is excellent. I was not well pleased to be jacking up the car and swapping out the tire. I have not had a flat in probably 10 years, so to have two in two days on the same tire…. No signe of a nail or anything either, so I am pretty sure it was just a lousy repair job.

      You deserve tons of views for your great blog. I probably said before, but I love it. It’s such a great idea and so well executed.

      I have been loving the comments lately, when I take a really nice picture, I hear about it. When I take a lousy one, I don’t hear anything much, which is just fine. No one likes to be told their work is poor, but I get the message loud and clear in a kind way. Thanks for you continuing interest and support I really appreciate it.

      Like

    • Paula!!! Thank you so much. I am totally thrilled to have a Kreativ Blogger Award. I have been tardy passing the awards on, but did spend a lot of time getting a post ready for a some of the ones I have been given recently – this is my first KBA though, so that is extra pleasing 🙂

      Like

  3. Gorgeous. I like the monochrome one better, though. The clouds are more dramatic in that one and it balances the concrete. The buoy becomes a light gray blip (could be passed off as a wave), but I don’t think it matters. In fact, I think it is better that way. Because when I see it, my imagination goes wild with this picture–I imagine this is the gateway to another world. With the color, you see the buoy and it looks like a regular lake and regular clouds. It’s a cool picture, but it has much less of a mystical quality. I guess I like the romance of the fantastical and mystical. 🙂

    Like

    • Hi Holly – welcome to my blog. It’s great to have you visit, and for you to leave such a detailed comment. I see you and Joseph are pretty much on the same page about the ethereal/mystical/unreal side of this photo. I was not being sarcastic in my reply to Joseph – I do find it fantastic that a simple thing like a slab of concrete with some pebbles and seaweed on it can be used to evoke such a mood. That is very cool. Though I can’t say I “used” it because I was not shooting for a mood so much as an appearance of some kind, and ended up with this mood. Which is one of the fun things about taking pictures.

      Like

      • Yeah-it’s amazing what the camera will pick up that you either didn’t notice, or didn’t intend for.

        I’m still very much a beginner and I don’t have any fancy equipment due to budgetary restraints (grr. I so want to get a decent camera and some lenses), but I like to take photos anyway. I’m tickled when I take a picture that turns out way better than I ever anticipated.

        I took some photos once of an old 1920’s one-room jailhouse–at dusk and during the next day. The dusk photos made the pictures have a different color quality to them, so that the old wood almost looked purple in tinge. So I got some neat effects without ever using any sort of filters. That was a good learning experience. I’ve since used dusk to my advantage to take some other pretty pictures.

        Not sure why I mentioned that–oh, yeah, because of the unanticipated mood you mentioned. Anyway, it was neat.

        And you’re right, discovering the things your camera comes up with is definitely one of the fun things about taking pictures!

        Like

      • Hi Holly. I too feel like a beginner, which is mostly true in terms of using a DSLR. I have had film cameras for decades, but used them only to ducment things at my work and not for more creative purposes. So, learning how to take creative photos is something I have only been doing for 5 or 6 months now. It is fun, in so many ways.

        Like

      • Hey, that’s a nice picture, interesting too. The purplish/blue tinge must be from the late light. Its definitely worth going out at dawn and dusk to take pictures when the light is so wonderful.

        Like

  4. It’s a great image in color or b&w. I have no preference on this because the color is so subtle.
    I thought I heard the sound of air hissing out, but I think in may just be the wind.

    Like

    • Darn it Ken, I need you along when I am taking pictures, to listen for leaky tires (not to mention to pointers on the taking of photos). My problem is that the hiss of a leaking tire sounds pretty much the same as tinnitus.

      Like

    • Hi Lynn – I like those subtle winter colours too. I really miss that pink speck in the black and white, and one day I will understand how to insert it with the software that we have here at home (my son’s). If he were not off playing at a festival (with his keyboards, guitar, bass, drumkit and my camera) this weekend, I would have sought his help.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: