Maple Leaf

I took these pictures 2 or 3 weeks ago when we took some of our apples out to Oldfield Valley to get them juiced. The owner of this row of trees tells me these leaves are from sugar maples. Not having seen a sugar maple that I can remember, I will take his word for it.

I was drawn to the colours, especially the underside of the leaves. And, of course, the water drops.

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To open the gallery below click on any thumbnail, navigate with the arrows and escape to return to this page.

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Canon 5Dii, Canon 100mm f2.8 macro lens, ISO640, f 2.8, hand-held at various shutter speeds.

26 thoughts on “Maple Leaf

    • That red leaf is almost too much for me. Can you imagine a carpet of those on the ground? I think my camera sensor might just pack it in if I exposed it to too many of those leaves. The underside is very much more my kinds of colour.

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      • I really like these images. Perhaps we will have a chance to shoot together next fall. I also want to see you in action with your modern DSLR and vintage glass 😉

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      • That certainly would be fun. I have only ever gone out on a shoot once with another photographer – and that was a few weeks ago with the Toad of Toadhollow Photography who lives up-island near Duncan, and we had a great time.
        As to the vintage glass. I am drifting away from it a bit. I have an autofocus Canon macro lens now for a variety of reasons, but quite a bit to do with focus, even with focus confirm, was a bit of an issue with my glasses prescription making it hard to focus properly. Its a lot faster too. The Nikkor 24mm is still very much in use – it’s limitations are quite a bit of distortion and not the best coatings so it has some chromatic aberration issues, and the adapter chip is intermittent in giving me focus confirm, and proper EXIF data sometimes too. I stressed it on a field trip to Haida Gwaii in the summer and it has never quite come back – same for the Takumar macro. I also still use, but only rarely, my Takumar 200mm and 35mm lenses. The first is heavy and not always with me and the latter is not needed too much with fast 24mm and 50mm lenses always in use. Both these Takumar lenses are slow as well (f4 and f3.5).
        Having said all that, the manual lenses are great for video – you don’t have to stop recording to change the f-stop, as with the Canon lenses, and autofocus does not work in video at all well, so manual it is, regardless of lens.

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    • Thanks Lynn! I like that one too – if had been thinking a bit more carefully I would have used it as the transition image to the macros instead of in the fourth spot in the gallery.

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    • Hi Toad – thanks so much. They were really eye catching, that pinkish grey. I had been out there one day to drop the apples off and wanted to take a photo but did not have time. The next day when I picked up the juice, I made sure to get some shots.

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  1. This is another great macro series. Man, you are on a roll!!! Sugar Maples are common around here and among the last trees to loose their leaves. The Museum has a Nature Center and, when it gets colder out, has demonstrations on how the sap (or syrup) is extracted and boiled down each year. Although I would love to see this, I haven’t made it out there for these events.

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    • Thanks Ken! Our friends that own these trees tried to tap them last year, for the first time (they are probably only 20-30 years old) and got a small amount of syrup – they were very pleased. We don’t really have the right weather around here, nor the best species of maple. The local species are sometimes used, but I understand its not really worth the effort. It would be interesting to see and do this – it is considered one of those iconic Canadian activities, but is really an eastern one (Canada as seen through Toronto’s national newspaper, etc).

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