Sahsima Monochrome I

Sahsima is the Songhees First Nation name for this rock, which in their histories is a man that was harpooning seals who was turned to stone for rebuking Hayls the Transformer. I have previously posted about it here, with some of the information that is publically available about this story. Sahsima has many personalities throughout the year and at different tides – a very different mood is evident in this post.

These two photos were taken last weekend – just after trying out my ND filter on the tide pool located just to the left of these images and just before turning my attention to the cloud behind Gonzales Hill.


For a map of this location see this link which I put together for my series on the cairns which mark Songhees history within Oak Bay: Map link – zoom in and you will find a marker for the exact location of the stone, as well as one for the cairn. Each of the map markers also includes a link back to this blog for my posts about each of these places – click on the marker and it will expand into a window with a thumbnail and link.

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Canon EOS 5Dii, 50mm/f1.4 Canon lens, ISO400. Top f8, 1/640th.  Bottom image  f13, 1/250th. White balance set on tungsten (accidentally). B&W conversion in Picasa.

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24 thoughts on “Sahsima Monochrome I

    • Thank you for you comment Helen. The shot really emphasizes the bigness of the rock (if that’s a good way of putting it, it makes it look bigger than it is, but it is very big).

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    • Hi xinapray – it is an important place in local geography and I have been struggling to depict the significance, so it is great that you are finding some of it in the photo.

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    • Karen – you are so kind. It is so different at low tide from high. I will probably post some long exposure higher tide shots soon when most of this is underwater.

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    • Hello David – I am still learning when b&w is the answer to a photograph, I think it does the job here, at the very least it salvaged some photos that were in need of serious colour correction.

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    • Hi Ryan – thank you. I wish there was a more detailed version of the transformer story available. There must be a long version that is told on special occassions.

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    • Hi Anne – welcome back! Thanks for your comment. Its great that people can kayak at this time of the year. A day or so later we were hit by quite heavy snow and cold (for here) and I doubt this guy was out and about on the water.

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    • Hi Ken – thanks so much. When I have been presenting this rock as part of Songhees history, I have been reluctant to insert non-Songhees people into the pictures as I was trying to illustrate a key element of that story, the rock. But sometimes people make all the difference, and I have not taken another picture that gives the size of the rock such good perspective as the top one does.

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    • Thank you Toad – it had to go to black and white because of the white balance error on my part. But also, the sky really needed a graduated filter treatment which was not going to work too well in the colour version.

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    • Thanks so much Joseph. I generally like to take pictures without people in them, but sometimes they make a shot, with scale if nothing else. I think both of these pictures benefit from people, and this past weekedn is the only time I have photographed the rock with people in it.

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  1. I am not very well and do not get out of the house much. I need to rest a lot to get better. I often lie in bed and meditate on your stunningly beautiful photographs. They are inspiring! I used to travel a lot. Now I cannot, I have your pictures to take me to other worlds!

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    • Hi Katherine, thank you for your kind words. You blog is one of my favourites – its such a great idea, and so well executed. I am glad to know my photographs are giving you a taste of travel, to know that they help people in such ways is unexpected and heartwarming and inspires me to contine with the blog. Thanks for giving my day a wonderful start with your comment 🙂

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