Bridge Barge V

My final set of images associated with the barge used to dismantle the bridge. Somewhere in one of the posts in this series I mentioned that I had only a short time to take pictures and that it was hard to get a good vantage for photographing the action and thus my eye turned in the opposite direction. In the end I took more pictures of this barge which was slotted under the bridge with the big red crane resting on the other end from where I could see, than I did of the bridge itself. I lead today with the colour version of a photo I posted a while back called Bridge Barge II. At first I really preferred the black and white version that I posted before, but when I cam across the un-cropped and only lightly processed colour version again yesterday, I realised that it had its own merits, and on balance I think I prefer the colour version, right now. Ask me next week, and I will probably be back to the black and white again.

I also include another images of the barge that I liked, one of which might have stood on its own in a post (the cable on deck shot), a shot of the barge from a bit further away which is more a context shot, and end with another version of the rope coiled on the deck that was in Bridge Barge III – with different colour treatment which I like nearly as well as the previously posted shot.

At some point I will take more photos of the bridge as it comes to pieces, and you will be subjected to more of the dying throes of the Blue Bridge. You can find my other posts about this bridge and barge here.

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Canon EOS 5Dii, Canon 50mm/f1.4 lens, various ISO and exposures.

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14 thoughts on “Bridge Barge V

      • Well – I have been down to the bridge again with the 24mm, but there is no barge anymore. More bridge pictures are coming, but not as interesting as the barge shots, to me anyway. Maybe I have another one or two that could see the light of day. But some of these series go on too long. I was thinking this might be one of them.

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  1. I agree with you that the first one works better in colour. The colours are unusual but work well together and add something special to the picture, and that is confirmed by the final shot that is my favourite of the bunch. Simplicity itself but the mottled pastel shades in the majority of that shot are the perfect counter-balance to that wonderful coil of rope. A shot that many folk would have completely missed. Well done.

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    • Hi Andy – thanks so much. That coil of rope was calling out to me loud and clear, but mine was the only camera of a dozen or more pointed at the barge, let alone down at the barge deck. However, if they had got out of my way so I could get a clear shot from the angle I wanted, I might have been satisified and not looked in this direction either.

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  2. More great shots in the series. i still am drawn to the last one, though, partly because the color differences between the rope and deck and the sparse feeling overall. The simplicity is pleasing.
    I have been meaning to mention that your series photos have a historical significance. Because of this, I would make a copy of each of the photos in the series and place them in a separate folder. Keep the folders updated as the series progresses. Eventually, this will be a cohesive work that can be edited and archived. Some museums might be grateful for the donation someday.

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    • Hi Ken. Good suggestion to keep them all together, right now they are stored by date, mostly, though I do have some named folders of subjects that get added to (like the Chinese Cemetery for instance). I am just trying to sort out how to store my images. I have donated a small number of slides to the museum in the past – ones with potential anthropological interest and they were pleased to get them.

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    • Thanks David, they kept the road bridge open during nearly the whole operation, except for during the time they did the heavy lifting, so there was a place to take pictures from. When the road bridge comes out, it could be a different story, although that won’t happen until a new road bridge is in place where the rail bridge has come from, so maybe there will be a good viewing station then too.

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