Moss Roof

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Today I continue my series from San Juan Island in Washington State with some more HDR processed images of an old house parked next to Beaverton Valley Road.  The house looks as if it were moved to this location since it rests well above the ground on struts. In any case, the roof was irresistible. I  wish I could have explored around a bit, but did not want to trespass so kept to the margins of the road. The light was pretty bad – a bright background and deeply shaded front of the building – so I opted for HDR to even things out a bit.

 

I continue to have some issues with the chip in the adapter for my old Nikkor lens, which really surface when shooting brackets. Every second series of brackets is overexposed. I have taken to pressing the shutter twice and getting two sets of bracket. This gives me brackets that are useable – sometimes only 3, other times 5 or 6. For these images I have used everything available that was not blown out, rather than picking the best three brackets at even E.V. spacing.

For me it is a toss-up between the first and last images. I like the foreground and general composition in the first shot, but the processing worked better in the last and it is a better contextual shot too.

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Canon 5Dii, Nikkor-N 24/f2.8 lens, ISO400

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25 thoughts on “Moss Roof

    • Hi Glenda – thanks for stopping bye, for commenting and for following! Coat of paint might be helpful. Maybe there is a stash of old photos in the attic, out of the reach of drips!

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  1. A beautiful posting, this is perhaps one of my favorites coming from your camera. As far as the individual photos go it is difficult to come up with one that works best. Even though for the sake of a story I like to see the cabin in its wider setting, the close ups are more dramatically effective. So I marked 1 and 4 as the ones with the best development and visual impact initially. Having come back here some days later wanting to comment, I am very much taken with the more scenic aspects of nr2. It has good dramatic impact. All in all beautiful photography.

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    • Thanks so much Joseph. This building is fantastically photogenic, and I was glad to see it and to have pretty good conditions for photography.

      I was a bit rushed, with a car full of people itching to go places waiting across the road (I had the keys though, so they weren’t going anywhere 🙂 ). I would like to go back, with this kind of light at a bit better angle, and a tripod and more time. But, I am pretty satisfied with these though a bit bothered by some aspects of the processing.

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  2. You just know I love them all, but my hands-down favorite is the first! Awesome textures and details here, a truly quintessential west coast scene! I even love the grasses in the foreground giving a little context and scale, as well as an interesting perspective to the scene.

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    • Hi Toad – I did think you would love this spot, and I am glad you like the shots. Technical question for you, if you don’t mind, seeing as how your HDR processing is always so good: How do you deal with the areas in really deep shadow which come out bluish when tonemapping? In this instance, the area around the door. I worked on it in post and got it quite nice with a bit of a mask, but when I exported for WP, lost some of that work. Is it that I need more brackets, or can it be dealt with in Photomatix?

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    • Thanks Andy – a pasture in the sky is a nice thought. Your comment makes me realise I should have tried for a slightly lower angle – with the foreground grasses blending straight into the roof, with the broken gable poking up between. It could have been an interesting shot. Too bad I am not within easy reach to try again.

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  3. For me, the collapsed struts that hold up the porch roof are a focal point in these pics, like the ribs in a skeleton of a dead horse that has been savaged by wolves.

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    • Val, I think you may have heard too many European folk tales in your childhood! I doubt there have been wolves on San Juan Island for the past 150 years, though there is an abundance of horses. Perhaps a marine theme is more appropriate – the ribs of a whale, done in by a pack of orcas?

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  4. My favorite is the first shot here. I think it best shows the house in its environment and although it doesn’t have the detail of the last shot, which I really like, too. This is a very interesting house to be sure. I wonder how old it is.

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    • Thanks Ken!. From the style I would think the house is a bit more than 100 years old. That moss must have been growing for a significant portion of its life – 10% or even 20% I would guess.

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    • Hi Melinda – that is exactly the way things go around here. None of your drying up and blowing away in this part of the world where vegetation slowly takes control.

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      • When we lived in Louisiana we learned about kudzu, an invasive plant that would grow over anything (even people, I think, if they stood still for more than 15 or 20 minutes.) It gave the rural areas a surreal look – green lumps looked ALMOST like buildings, or NEARLY like power poles, or SORT OF like abandoned tractors. But not quite.

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      • Now that sounds like serious vegetation. English ivy is bad enough in this area, which people, even the sane ones, plant in their gardens. Never to be successfully removed thereafter.

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